Your Backyard Wildlife Habitat: What’s in Your Backyard?

This is the second in a series of articles about considering your backyard wildlife habitat.

photo of pink phlox

Tall Phlox © 2010 B.E. Kazmarski

You think planning your garden is fun? Wait until you start an inventory of what’s currently available for wildlife in your yard. You will be shocked at what you have already, and if you’re not too clear on native species now just the process of identification will show you at least your most common native plants and animals and you’ll feel like an expert.

Where and how you garden

If you are reading about a backyard wildlife habitat, then it’s probably safe to assume that you are already gardening, even if you live in an apartment or just have a patio.

I gardened for a while with a flower box on my apartment balcony railing, a half-barrel with tomatoes, peppers and basil, a bird feeder and a deep-dish pie pan for a birdbath. I also had a garden behind an apartment building where I wasn’t supposed to garden, and I don’t suggest you do that, but it just illustrates that gardening can be done anywhere there is soil, light and water—and determination—and birds, bees and butterflies will come.

Likewise, the habitat doesn’t need to be in your backyard, nor be confined to your backyard. Community gardens, parks and other public places are also habitats—native flora and fauna don’t recognize our boundaries. The public area may also have most or all of the requirements for a habitat, or with permission of the authority for the public area you may enhance it. Whatever your space, consider it your habitat for the purposes of inventory.

Read the rest of this entry »


Photography Inspired by My Backyard Wildlife Habitat

photo of buttercups

Buttercups © B.E. Kazmarski

I started out just setting up galleries with clickable thumbnails, then I went to Flash slideshows. I like them both, but neither one is easy to update! I need to get back to these and add more, but for now enjoy the show. Click the title to go to the gallery.

All of these photos are available as prints or sets of notecards, or you may purchase reproduction rights for use on a website or print publication. Please respect my ownership of these images and purchase them if you’d like to use them.

close-up photo of fleabane
May and June Wildflowers

A few of these are not in my backyard. The slideshow may not begin automatically depending on your browser; look for the link at the bottom of the paragraph.

photo of leek blossom seed head

Winter Leftovers

I leave plants, especially natives, standing through the winter for foraging birds and other wildlife, and for insects to lay their eggs and nest. When I cleaned out my garden this spring I was entranced by the delicate beauty of all the dry, empty seed heads, the tattered spiderwebs and brittle stems. The slideshow may not begin automatically depending on your browser; look for the link at the bottom of the paragraph.

photo of black raspberries in dish
Berries

An ever-expanding gallery as the birds “bring” more berries to my yard all the time, and one that I really need to update now that I think about it. I have more berries than this in the yard, and had perfect weather in June for photographing them.

photo of tomatoes and peppers

Vegetables

Just a few photos of some vegetables. Most of them are on film, and I’m looking for a good negative scanner rather than scan the prints.

I have other galleries there featuring birds, butterflies and critters, and although more than half of each gallery was taken in my back yard, it’s not technically of my backyard wildlife habitat—but feel free to take a look while you are there.

Read all the articles in this series

An Introduction to Backyard Wildlife Habitats

What’s in Your Backyard? The First Step in Planning Your Backyard Wildlife Habitat

What Else is in Your Backyard: The Fauna That Fill It

Bringing it All Together: Enhancing and Developing Your Habitat

Art Inspired by My Backyard Wildlife Habitat

Photography Inspired by My Backyard Wildlife Habitat

Poetry Inspired by My Backyard Wildlife Habitat

Prose Inspired by My Backyard Wildlife Habitat


What’s in Your Backyard? The First Step in Planning Your Backyard Wildlife Habitat

This is the second in a series of four articles about considering your backyard wildlife habitat.

photo of pink phlox

Tall Phlox © 2010 B.E. Kazmarski

You think planning your garden is fun? Wait until you start an inventory of what’s currently available for wildlife in your yard. You will be shocked at what you have already, and if you’re not too clear on native species now just the process of identification will show you at least your most common native plants and animals and you’ll feel like an expert.

Where and how you garden

If you are reading about a backyard wildlife habitat, then it’s probably safe to assume that you are already gardening, even if you live in an apartment or just have a patio.

I gardened for a while with a flower box on my apartment balcony railing, a half-barrel with tomatoes, peppers and basil, a bird feeder and a deep-dish pie pan for a birdbath. I also had a garden behind an apartment building where I wasn’t supposed to garden, and I don’t suggest you do that, but it just illustrates that gardening can be done anywhere there is soil, light and water—and determination—and birds, bees and butterflies will come.

Likewise, the habitat doesn’t need to be in your backyard, nor be confined to your backyard. Community gardens, parks and other public places are also habitats—native flora and fauna don’t recognize our boundaries. The public area may also have most or all of the requirements for a habitat, or with permission of the authority for the public area you may enhance it. Whatever your space, consider it your habitat for the purposes of inventory.
The story continues, keep reading…